Alban Berg

Alban Maria Johannes Berg is one of the central figures of twentieth-century music. As one of the ruling triumvirate of the Second Viennese School, Berg produced a rather small body of work that is nonetheless distinguished by a strongly Romantic aesthetic and a distinctive dramatic sense.

Berg's father was an export salesman, his mother the daughter of the Austrian Imperial jeweler. The young Alban's musical training consisted mainly of piano lessons from his aunt; by his teenage years, however, he had composed dozens of songs without the benefit of formal compositional studies.

Berg was a dreamy youth and an indifferent student. In 1903, he endured the end of a passionate (if adolescent) love affair, failed his school finishing exams, and became despondent over the death of his idol, composer Hugo Wolf, all of which led to a suicide attempt. However, he survived to repeat his final year of school and went to work as an apprentice accountant. In 1904 Berg's brother, Charley, took Alban's compositions to Arnold Schoenberg, who accepted Berg as a student. In 1907 Berg met the singer Helene Nahowski, overcame her parents' objections over his poor health (he had severe asthma) and lack of prospects, and married her in 1911.

The composer was drafted into the Austrian Army in 1915, served for eleven months, and was discharged for poor health. The army experience led him to revisit Woyzeck Georg Buchner's tregadey about a horribly brutalized private. In 1917, Berg began an operatic adaptation of the play, which occupied him for the next five years. When the Austro-Hungarian empire collapsed in the wake of World War I, Berg found work as business manager of Schoenberg's Society for Private Musical Performances, an organization which allowed Vienna's musical avant-garde to enjoy professionally prepared performances before friendly, critic-free audiences.

After a number of interruptions related to personal and familial affairs, Berg completed Wozzeck in 1922. Though initially savaged by critics, the opera eventually gained momentum, enjoying performances throughout Europe and recognition as a masterpiece. Berg's next major work, the Chamber Concerto (1923-25) was among his first to demonstrate the influence of Schoenberg's twelve-tone method, though the work does not make rigorous, consistent use of twelve-tone practices. During 1925-26, Berg wrote the Lyric Suite for string quartet, parts of which systematically employ twelve-tone principles. The Lyric Suite remains one of the composer's most often performed works; George Gershwin, it is said, had a particular admiration for this music. Years after Berg's death, scholars confirmed that the composer had originally included a sung text in the last movement, a tribute to his "secret" lover, Hanna Fuchs-Robertin. The Suite is now sometimes performed with this restored text.

The last of Berg's works are among his most important. The Violin Concerto (1935) is dedicated "to the Memory of an Angel," a reference to the daughter of Alma Mahler (a close ally) and Walter Gropius, Manon, who had died at the age of 19. The work is particularly striking in its lyrical expressiveness and for the incorporation of tonal elements into its twelve-tone idiom. At the time of his death from blood poisoning in 1935, Berg was in the middle of work on his opera Lulu, a sexual horror story, which he had begun in 1929. The opera's unfinished third act was completed by Friedrich Cerha in 1976, after twelve years of work.

Year / Artwork Title Importance Medium
1907-1908 Sieben fruehe Lieder 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Anne-Sofie van Otter, Bengt Forsberg, Geoffrey Parsons, Margaret Marshall, Aribert Reimann, Dietrich-Fischer Dieskau
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1908  Sonate für Klavier Opus 1 4.00 stars CD
Alban Berg - Sonate für Klavier Comments:
Daniel Barenboim - Piano

Also part of The Alban Berg Collection

1909-1910 Streichquartett opus 3 4.50 stars LP
Alban Berg - Lyrische Suite / Streichquartett Comments:

LaSalle Quartet

This is part of the 5 disk set  Neue Wiener Schule: Die Streichquartte.
Including a 185 page book with an introduction.

Also part of The Alban Berg Collection

1909-1910 Streichquartett opus 3 4.00 stars LP
Alban Berg - Streichquartett Comments:
Alban Berg Quartett
1912   Altenberger Lieder Opus 4 4.00 stars LP
Alban Berg - Altenberger Lieder Opus 4 Comments:
5 Songs based on texts from Picture Postcards by Peter Altenberger

Halina Lukomska - soprano
BBC Symphony Orchestra cond. Pierre Boulez
1912 Altenberger Lieder Opus 4 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Juliane Banse
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1913   Vier Stücke für Klarinette und Klavier Opus 5 4.00 stars CD
Alban Berg - Vier Stücke für Klarinette und Klavier Comments:
Beautiful clarinet playing by Antony Pay
Daniel Barenboim - Piano
1913 Vier Stücke für Klarinette und Klavier Opus 5 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Sabine Meyer - Clarinet
Oleg Maisenberg - Piano

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1914   Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 4.50 stars LP
Alban Berg - Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 Comments:
From the Philips Modern Music Series.

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Antal Dorati

Written for Arnold Schoenbergs 40th birthday.
Comments:
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Antal Dorati

Release on CD from the same recording as above.
1914-1915 Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 4.50 stars LP
Alban Berg - Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 Comments:
BBC Symphony Orchestra cond. Pierre Boulez
1914-1915 Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Also part of The Alban Berg Collection

1914-1915 Three Pieces for Orchestra opus 6 4.50 stars DVD
Comments:
Berliner Philharmoniker cond. Simon Rattle

Recorded in sept, 2010 from BBC TV

1929 Version

ca. 1921 Wein, Weib und Gesang, waltz for orchestra 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Orchestration of composition by Johann II Strauss

Boston Symphony Chamber Players

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1917-1922 Wozzeck Opus 7 5.00 stars LP
Alban Berg - Wozzeck [Karl Böhm] Comments:
This is Alban Berg's expressionist masterpiece.

Evelyn Lear, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and Karl Böhm. Beautiful.

Synopsis

Act I

Scene 1 (Suite):
Wozzeck is shaving the Captain who lectures him for living an immoral life. Wozzeck protests that it is difficult to be virtuous when he is poor, but entreats the Captain to remember the lesson from the gospel, ""Laßet die Kleinen zu mir kommen!"" ("Suffer the little children to come unto me," Mark 10:14). The Captain greets this admonition with pointed dismay.

Scene 2 (Rhapsody and Hunting Song):
Wozzeck and Andres are cutting sticks as the sun is setting. Wozzeck has frightening visions and Andres tries unsuccessfully to calm him.

Scene 3 (March and Lullaby):
A military parade passes by outside Marie's room. Margret taunts Marie for flirting with the soldiers. Then Wozzeck comes by and tells Marie of the terrible visions he has had.

Scene 4 (Passacaglia):
The Doctor scolds Wozzeck for not following his instructions regarding diet and behavior (which Wozzeck has been submitting to make extra money for Marie). However, when the Doctor hears of Wozzeck's mental aberrations, he is delighted and congratulates himself on the success of his experiment.

Scene 5 (Rondo):
Marie admires the Drum-major outside her room. He makes an advance on her, to which she first rejects but then gives in.

Act II

Scene 1 (Sonata-Allegro):
Marie is telling her child to go to sleep while admiring earrings which the Drum-major gave her. She is startled when Wozzeck arrives and when he asks where she got the earrings, she says she found them. Though not convinced, Wozzeck gives her some money and leaves. Marie chastises herself for her behavior.

Scene 2 (Fantasia and Fugue on 3 Themes):
The Doctor rushes by the Captain in the street, who urges him to slow down. The Doctor then proceeds to scare the Captain by speculating what afflictions may strike him. When Wozzeck comes by, they insinuate that Marie is being unfaithful to him.

Scene 3 (Largo):
Wozzeck confronts Marie, who does not deny his suspicions. Enraged, Wozzeck is about to hit her, when she stops him, saying even her father never dared lay a hand on her. Her statement "better a knife in my belly than your hands on me" plants in Wozzeck's mind the idea for his subsequent revenge.

Scene 4 (Scherzo):
Among a crowd, Wozzeck sees Marie dancing with the Drum-major. After a brief hunter's chorus, Andres asks Wozzeck why he is sitting by himself. An Apprentice delivers a drunken sermon, then an Idiot approaches Wozzeck and cries out that the scene is ""Lustig, lustig...aber es riecht …Ich riech, ich riech Blut!"" ("joyful, joyful, but it reeks...I smell, I smell blood").

Scene 5 (Rondo):
In the barracks at night, Wozzeck, unable to sleep, is keeping Andres awake. The Drum-major comes in, intoxicated, and rouses Wozzeck out of bed to fight with him.

Act III

Scene 1 (Invention on Themes and Variations):
In her room at night, Marie reads to herself from the Bible. She cries out that she wants forgiveness.

Scene 2 (Invention on a Pedal-Point):
Wozzeck and Marie are walking in the woods by a pond. Marie is anxious to leave, but Wozzeck restrains her. As a blood-red moon rises, Wozzeck becomes determined that if he can't have Marie, no one else can, and he stabs her.

Scene 3 (Invention on a Rhythm):
People are dancing in a tavern. Wozzeck enters, and upon seeing Margret, dances with her and pulls her onto his lap. He insults her, and then asks her to sing him a song. She sings, but then notices blood on his hand and elbow; everyone begins shouting at him, and Wozzeck, now agitated and obsessed with his blood, rushes out of the tavern.

Scene 4 (Invention on a 6-Note Chord):
Having returned to the murder scene, Wozzeck becomes obsessed with the thought that the knife he killed Marie with will incriminate him, and throws it into the pond. When the blood-red moon appears again, he wades into the pond and drowns. The Captain and the Doctor, passing by, hear Wozzeck moaning and rush off in fright.Intermezzo (Invention on a Key): This interlude leads to the finale.

Scene 5 (Invention on a Equal of 8ths quasi toccata):
Next morning, children are playing in the sunshine. The news spreads that Marie's body has been found, and they all run off to see, except for Marie's little boy, who after an oblivious moment, follows after the others. 

From Wikipedia

1917-1922 Wozzeck 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Walter Raffeiner, Viktoria Lehner, Heinz Zednik, Franz Grundheber, Anna Gonda, Philip Langridge, Alfred Sramek, Alexander Maly, Hildegard Behrens, Aage Haugland, Werner Kamenik, Peter Jelosits
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1923-1925 Kammerkonzert (für Klavier und Geige mit 13 Bläser) 4.50 stars LP
Alban Berg - Chamber Concerto for Piano, Violin and 13 Wind Instruments Comments:
Daniel Barenboim - piano
Sachko Gawriloff - violin
Solists conducted by Pierre Boulez
1923-1925 Kammerkonzert (für Klavier und Geige mit 13 Bläser) 4.50 stars CD
Alban Berg - Kammerkonzert [für Klavier und Geige mit 13 Bläser] Comments:
This what all the 1960's hackers were searching for.

Daniel Bärenboim - piano
Pinchas Zukerman - violon
Ensemble InterContemporain cond. Pierre Boulez

Also part of The Alban Berg Collection

1926   Lyrische Suite 4.00 stars LP
Alban Berg - Lyrische Suite Comments:
Alban Berg Quartett
1926 Lyrische Suite 4.50 stars LP
Alban Berg - Lyrische Suite / Streichquartett Comments:

LaSalle Quartet

This is part of the 5 disk set  Neue Wiener Schule: Die Streichquartte.
Including a 185 page book with an introduction.

Also part of The Alban Berg Collection

1928 Lyric Suite, for orchestra (arr. from Nos.2-4 of string quartet version) 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1930 Der Wein 4.00 stars LP + CD
Alban Berg - Der Wein Comments:
Jessye Norman
New York Philharmonic cond. Pierre Boulez
1930 Der Wein 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Anne Sofie von Otter
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1929-1935 Lulu 5.00 stars DVD
Alban Berg - Lulu Comments:
Famous Glyndebourne Festival production from 1996

This is the version as finished by Friedrich Cerha

Lulu -- Christine Schafer
Countess Geschwitz -- Kathryn Harries
Dr Shon/Jack the Ripper -- Wolfgang Schone

London Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Andrew Davis

Synopsis 

Prologue:
A circus ringmaster introduces the various animals in his menagerie. The last is Lulu herself, who is carried on stage and introduced as a snake.

Act I

Scene 1:
Lulu, the wife of Dr. Goll, an elderly doctor, is having her portrait painted. Dr. Schön, a newspaper editor who rescued Lulu from the gutter and with whom she is now having an affair, is also present. Presently, his son Alwa arrives, excuses himself, and he and Dr. Schön leave. The Painter makes heavy passes at Lulu. Dr. Goll unexpectly walks in, and finding the two of them alone, promptly collapses and dies of a heart attack.

Scene 2:
Lulu has now married the Painter. She receives a telegram announcing Dr. Schön's engagement, which seems to trouble her. She is visited by Schigolch, a tramp who seems to have featured in her past in some unspecified way. Dr. Schön arrives, referring to Schigolch as Lulu's father. He has come to ask Lulu to stay out of his life from now on. She is unmoved by his request, and when the Painter, her husband, arrives she leaves. Dr. Schön tells the Painter about their affair, and insists he confront his wife about it. The Painter leaves, ostensibly to confront Lulu, but instead, he slits his own throat. Lulu appears to be unmoved by this suicide, and simply tells Dr. Schön "You'll marry me all the same."

Scene 3:
Lulu, working as a dancer, is sitting in her dressing room with Alwa. The two discuss various things, including a Prince who is in love with Lulu and wants to marry her. Lulu leaves to take the stage, but refuses to go on because Dr. Schön and his fiancée are in the audience. Dr. Schön, comes in to try to convince her to perform. When the two are left alone, she tells Schön that she is thinking of leaving with the Prince for Africa. Dr. Schön realises that he cannot live without her, and is convinced by Lulu to write a letter to his fiancée breaking off his engagement, which Lulu herself dictates. Lulu then calmly continues with the show.

Act II

Scene 1:
Lulu has now married Dr. Schön, who is full of jealousy over her many admirers. One of them, the lesbian Countess Geschwitz, visits her to invite her to a ball, but leaves in the face of Dr. Schön's disapproval. When the two go out, the Countess returns and hides. Two other admirers, the Acrobat and the Schoolboy, also enter, and all begin to talk to Lulu when she returns. Presently, Alwa arrives, and the admirers hide as Alwa declares his love for Lulu. Dr. Schön returns, spots the Acrobat, and begins a long argument with Lulu, during the course of which he discovers the other admirers. He gives Lulu a revolver, and orders her to kill herself, but she shoots Schön instead. The police arrive to arrest Lulu for the murder.

Interlude:
The interlude consists of a silent film (accompanied by Berg's palindromic score). In it, we see Lulu's arrest, trial, conviction and imprisonment. Then we see her deliberately contract cholera and be transferred to hospital. The Countess Geschwitz visits her, and gives her her clothes, so that Lulu can escape disguised as her, which she does.

Scene 2:
The Countess Geschwitz, Alwa and the Acrobat are gathered in the same room as Act II, Scene 1. They are awaiting Schigolch, who is to take the Countess to the hospital. She is going to sacrifice her own freedom by taking Lulu's place so that nobody will discover she has escaped until it is too late. The Acrobat says he is going to marry Lulu and move with her to Paris where the two will work in an act together. Schigolch leaves with the countess, then returns with Lulu, who is so ill from her disease that the Acrobat abandons his plan, and goes off to summon the police instead. Schigolch is sent off to buy train tickets, and, left alone, Alwa and Lulu declare their love for each other and agree to go away together.

Act III

Scene 1:
Lulu and Alwa are now living in Paris. The scene is a party in a casino. Lulu is being blackmailed into working in a Cairo brothel by the Acrobat and a pimp; she is still wanted for Dr. Schön's murder and they will turn her in if she does not do as they say. Schigolch arrives, asking for money. She is eventually convinced to lure the Acrobat away to a hotel and murder him. After they have gone, news arrives that shares in the railway, which the party guests all owned and had so much confidence in, have crashed. The party quickly breaks up, and in the confusion, Lulu manages to change clothes with a young man. She escapes with Alwa just before the police arrive to recapture her.

Scene 2:
Lulu and Alwa are now living with Schigolch in poverty and are on the run in London. Lulu is working as a prostitute. She arrives with a client, a professor (played by the same actor as Dr. Goll, Lulu's first husband). The Countess Geschwitz then arrives with a portrait of Lulu which she has brought from Paris. Alwa hangs it on the wall. Lulu goes out, and returns with another client, the Black Man (played by the same actor as the Painter, Lulu's second husband). He refuses to pay in advance, and kills Alwa in a struggle. Schigolch removes the body while Geschwitz contemplates suicide, an idea she gives up when she realises that Lulu is not moved by it. Eventually, Lulu goes out and returns with a third client (played by the same actor as Dr. Schön, Lulu's third husband). He haggles over the price, and is about to leave when Lulu decides she will sleep with him for less than her usual fee. This client, who is actually Jack the Ripper, murders Lulu, and then on his way out kills the Countess as well, who swears her love to Lulu as the curtain falls.

From Wikipedia

1929-1935 Lulu 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Pierre Doukan, Jules Bastin, Jane Manning, Franz Mazura, Claude Meloni, Georges Pludermacher, Kenneth Riegel, Ursula Boese, Gerd Nienstedt, Anna Ringart, Toni Blankenheim, Teresa Stratas, Yvonne Minton, Hanna Schwarz, Robert Tear, Helmut Pampuch
Orchestre de l'Opera de Paris cond. Pierre Boulez

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1929-1935 Lulu Suite 4.50 stars LP + CD
Alban Berg - Lulu: Suite Comments:
Alban Berg was a real sorcerer, 12 tone music which is exceptional beautiful.

Judith Blegen, New York Philharmonic, cond. Pierre Boulez

1929-1935 Lulu Suite 4.50 stars CD
Comments:
Helga Pilarczyk - Soprano
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Antal Dorati
1929-1935 Lulu Suite 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Juliane Banse - Soprano
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1935 VIolin Concerto 4.00 stars LP
Alban Berg - VIolin Concerto [Arthur Grumiaux] Comments:
Dem Andenken eines Engels, Requiem for an Angel.
Built on a 12-tone motive. Difficult, but also moving.

Arthur Grumiaux - violin
Concertgebouw Orkest Amsterdam cond. Igor Markevitch
1935 Violin Concerto 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Anna-Sophie Mutter - Violin
Chicago Symphony Orchestra cond. James Levine

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

1935 Violin Concerto 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Anna-Sophie Mutter - Violin
Chicago Symphony Orchestra cond. James Levine
1935 Violin Concerto 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Thomas Zehetmaier - Violin
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie cond. Heinz Holliger
1935 Adagio, for clarinet, violin & piano 4.00 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Arr. of 2nd movement. of "Chamber Concerto"

Sabine Meyer - Clarinet
Gideon Kremer - Violin
Oleg Maisenberg - Piano

Part of The Alban Berg Collection

Compilation The Alban Berg Collection 4.50 stars 8 CD
Comments:
Pieces (3) for orchestra, Op. 6
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Lyric Suite, for orchestra (arr. from Nos.2-4 of string quartet version)
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Violin Concerto
Performed by Chicago Symphony Orchestra
with Anne-Sophie Mutter
Conducted by James Levine

Chamber Concerto, for piano, violin, and 13 wind instruments
with Pinchas Zukerman, InterContemporain Ensemble, Daniel Barenboim
Conducted by Pierre Boulez

Piano Sonata, Op. 1  
with Daniel Barenboim

Pieces (4) for clarinet and piano, Op. 5
with Oleg Maisenberg, Sabine Meyer

Adagio, for clarinet, violin & piano (arr. of 2nd mvt. of "Chamber Concerto")
with Oleg Maisenberg, Sabine Meyer, Gidon Kremer

Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Women and Song), waltz for orchestra (with voice ad lib), Op. 333 (RV 333)
Composed by Johann II Strauss
with Boston Symphony Chamber Players

Lyric Suite, for string quartet

String Quartet, Op. 3 

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 1. Nacht
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 2. Schilflied
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 3. Die Nachtigall
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 4. Traumgekrönt
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 5. Im Zimmer
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 6. Liebesode
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 7. Sommertage
with Anne Sofie von Otter, Bengt Forsberg

Schliesse mir die Augen beide, song for voice & piano (2 settings)
with Geoffrey Parsons, Margaret Marshall

An Leukon, song for voice & piano (from "Jugenlieder")
with Geoffrey Parsons, Margaret Marshall

Schliesse mir die Augen beide, song for voice & piano (2 settings)
with Geoffrey Parsons, Margaret Marshall

Songs (4) for voice & piano, Op. 2
with Aribert Reimann, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 1. Nacht
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 2. Schilflied
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 3. Die Nachtigall
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 4. Traumgekrönt
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 5. Im Zimmer
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 6. Liebesode
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Early Songs (7), for voice & piano (or orchestra) 7. Sommertage
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Altenberg Lieder, collection of 5 songs for voice & orchestra, Op. 4
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Juliane Banse
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Der Wein, concert aria for soprano & orchestra
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Anne Sofie von Otter
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Lulu, suite (from the opera), for soprano & orchestra
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Juliane Banse
Conducted by Claudio Abbado

Lulu, opera
Performed by Orchestre de l'Opera de Paris
with Pierre Doukan, Jules Bastin, Jane Manning, Franz Mazura, Claude Meloni, Georges Pludermacher, Kenneth Riegel, Ursula Boese, Gerd Nienstedt, Anna Ringart, Toni Blankenheim, Teresa Stratas, Yvonne Minton, Hanna Schwarz, Robert Tear, Helmut Pampuch
Conducted by Pierre Boulez

Wozzeck, opera, Op. 7
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
with Walter Raffeiner, Viktoria Lehner, Heinz Zednik, Franz Grundheber, Anna Gonda, Philip Langridge, Alfred Sramek, Alexander Maly, Hildegard Behrens, Aage Haugland, Werner Kamenik, Peter Jelosits
Conducted by Claudio Abbado