Alexander Goedicke

Alexander Fyodorovich Goedicke was a Russian composer, pianist, organist and pedagogue of German descent. He studied with Safonov and G. Pabst (piano) and Arensky (composition) at the Moscow Conservatory, graduating in 1898.

Alexander Goedicke pursued an unspectacular career on four fronts as composer, pianist, organist and teacher. His compositional efforts were rewarded when he won the Rubenstein Prize for Composition at the young age of 23.He was a professor at Moscow Conservatory from 1909.

Alexander Goedicke numbers among a sizeable group of fine Russian musicians who virtually disappeared from view in the Soviet age, displaying neither the rebellious nature to attract the attention of refuseniks or Westerners nor the mindless adherence to political diktats which might have attracted state patronage (and later, probably, infamy). His large output of symphonies, operas and chamber music (in addition to works for his own instruments) remains to be explored but, oddly, he is remembered (if at all) for his Concert Etude for trumpet, which enlivens the sparse concert repertoire of that instrument, and for some unusually skilful and attractive children's piano pieces.

It seems a bizarre paradox that a fine organist as Alexander Goedicke should lavish so much care and imagination on concert transcriptions for the piano. Contrary to Western myth, the church was not totally suppressed under the communist regime but it was, of course, stripped of its hitherto fonnidable political power. Consequently it lacked the wherewithal, the expertise and possibly the will to maintain its organs in a usable state of repair. It is conceivable that Goedicke turned to the piano in sheer frustration but more likely that these transcriptions were simply a labour of love. His ingenuity and pianistic resourcefulness suggest that he had closely studied the transcriptions of Ferruccio Busoni (the undisputed master in this field), and many of the devices of the Italian genius can be heard in Goedicke's scores - octave displacements, interlinked thumbs for middle voices, and a general concern to discover truly pianistic equivalents to the organ's many voices, together with an awareness of church acoustics.

Year / Artwork Title Importance Medium
? Overture dramatique Opus 7 4.00 stars 5 CD
Arthur Bliss Comments:

Russian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra cond. Konstantin Krimetz

1914-1918 period Improvisations "At War", 4.00 stars 5 CD
Arthur Bliss Comments:
Russian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra cond. Konstantin Krimetz
1929 Concerto for Horn in F minor 4.00 stars 5 CD
Arthur Bliss Comments:
Gleb Karpushkin - French Horn

Russian Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra cond. Konstantin Krimetz

1930 Concerto for Trumpet 4.00 stars CD
Arthur Bliss Comments:
Vladimir Goncharov - Trumpet

Russian Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Konstantin Krimetz