Sofia Gubaidulina

Gubaidulina was born in Chistopol, in the Tatar ASSR. In her youth she would spend much time praying in the fields near her home that she might one day become a composer. She studied composition and piano at the Kazan Conservatory, graduating in 1954. In Moscow she undertook further studies at the Conservatory with Nikolay Peyko until 1959, and then with Shebalin until 1963. She was awarded with Stalin-fellowship. Her music was deemed "irresponsible" during her studies in Soviet Russia, due to its exploration of alternative tunings. She was supported, however, by Dmitri Shostakovich, who in evaluating her final examination encouraged her to continue down her "mistaken path". However, she was allowed to express her modernism in various scores she composed for documentary films, including the 1968 production, On Submarine Scooters, a 70mm film shot in the unique Kinopanorama widescreen format.

In the mid-1970s Gubaidulina founded Astreja, a folk-instrument improvisation group with fellow composers Viktor Suslin and Vyacheslav Artyomov. In 1979, she was blacklisted as one of the "Khrennikov's Seven" at the Sixth Congress of the Union of Soviet Composers for unapproved participation in some festivals of Soviet music in the West.

Gubaidulina became better known abroad during the early 1980s through Gidon Kremer's championing of her violin concerto Offertorium. She later composed an homage to T. S. Eliot, using the text from the poet's spiritual masterpiece Four Quartets. In 2000, Gubaidulina, along with Tan Dun, Osvaldo Golijov, and Wolfgang Rihm, was commissioned by the Internationale Bachakademie Stuttgart project to write a piece for the Passion 2000 project in commemoration of Johann Sebastian Bach. Her contribution was the Johannes-Passion. In 2002 she followed this by the Johannes-Ostern ("Easter according to John"), commissioned by Hannover Rundfunk. The two works together form a "diptych" on the death and resurrection of Christ, her largest work to date. Invited by Walter Fink, she was the 13th composer featured in the annual Komponistenportrait of the Rheingau Musik Festival in 2003, the first female composer of the series. Her work The Light at the End preceded Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in the 2005 proms. In 2007 her second violin concerto In Tempus Praesens was performed at the Lucerne Festival by Anne-Sophie Mutter. Its creation has been depicted in Jan Schmidt-Garre's film Sophia - Biography of a Violin Concerto.

Since 1992, Gubaidulina has lived in Hamburg, Germany. She is a member of the musical academies in Frankfurt, Hamburg and the Royal Swedish Academy of Music.

For Gubaidulina, music was an escape from the terrifying socio-political atmosphere of Soviet Russia. For this reason, she associated music with human transcendence and mystical spiritualism, which manifests itself as a longing inside the soul of humanity to locate its true being, a longing she continually tries to capture in her works. These abstract religious and mystical associations are concretized in Gubaidulina's compositions in various ways. Gubaidulina is a convinced Russian-Orthodox believer. The influence of electronic music and improvisational techniques is exemplified in her unusual combination of contrasting elements, novel instrumentation, and the use of traditional Russian folk instruments in her solo and chamber works, such as De profundis for bayan, Et expecto- Sonata for bayan, and In croce for cello and organ or bayan. The koto, a traditional Japanese instrument is featured in her work In The Shadow of The Tree, in which one solo player performs three different instrument-Koto, Bass Koto, and Chang. The Canticle of the Sun is a cello concerto/choral hybrid, dedicated to Rostropovich. The use of the lowest possible registers on the cello opens new possibilities for the instrument while the limited use of chorus also adds a mystical ambience to the work.

Another influence of improvisation techniques can be found in her fascination with percussion instruments. She associates the indeterminate nature of percussive timbres with the mystical longing and the potential freedom of human transcendence.

She was also preoccupied by experimentation with non-traditional methods of sound production, and as already mentioned, with unusual combinations of instruments, i.e. Concerto for Bassoon and Low Strings (1975), Detto- I Sonata for Organ and Percussion (1978), The Garden of Joy and Sorrow for Flute, Harp and Viola (1980), and Descensio for 3 Trombones, 3 Percussionists, Harp, Harpsichord/Celesta and Celesta/Piano (1981).

Gubaidulina notes that the two composers to whom she experiences a constant devotion are J.S. Bach and Webern. Among some non-musical influences of considerable import are Carl Jung (Swiss thinker and founder of analytical psychology) and Nikolai Aleksandrovich Berdiaev (Russian religious philosopher, whose works were forbidden in USSR, but nevertheless found and studied by the composer).

Being a profoundly religious person, Gubaidulina defines re-ligato as re-legato or as restoration of the connection between oneself and the Absolute. She finds this re-connection through the artistic process and has developed a number of musical symbols to express her ideals. She does it through narrower means of intervallic and rhythmic relationship within the primary material of her works, by seeking to discover the depth and mysticism of the sound, as well as on a larger scale, through carefully thought architecture of musical form.

Melodically, Gubaidulina's is characterized by the frequent use of intense chromatic motives rather than long melodic phrases. She often treats musical space as a means of attaining unity with the divine - a direct line to God - concretely manifest by the lack of striation in pitch space. She achieves this through the use of micro-chromaticism (i.e., quarter tones) and frequent glissandi, exemplifying the lack of steps to the divine. This notion is furthered by her extreme dichotomy characterized by chromatic space vs. diatonic space viewed as symbols of darkness vs. light and human/mundane vs. divine/heavenly. Finally, the use of short motivic segments allows her to create a musical narrative that is seemingly open-ended and disjunct rather than smooth.

Harmonically, Gubaidulina's music resists traditional tonal centers and triadic structures in favor of pitch clusters and intervallic design arising from the contrapuntal interaction between melodic voices. For example, in the Cello Concerto Detto-2 (1972) she notes that a strict and progressive intervallic process occurs, in which the opening section utilizes successively wider intervals that become narrower toward the last section. Rhythmically, Gubaidulina places significant stress on the fact that temporal ratios should not be limited to local figuration; rather, the temporality of the musical form should be the defining feature of rhythmic character.

As Gerard McBurney states:
In conversation she is most keen to stress that she cannot accept the idea (a frequent post-serial one) of rhythm or duration as the material of a piece. . . . To her, rhythm is nowadays a generating principle as, for instance, the cadence was to tonal composers of the Classical period; it therefore cannot be the surface material of a work. . . . [S]he expresses her impatience with Messiaen, whose use of rhythmic modes to generate local imagery, she feels, restricts the effectiveness of rhythm as an underlying formal level of the music.

To this end, Gubaidulina often devises durational ratios in order to create the temporal forms for her compositions. Specifically, she is prone to utilizing elements of the Fibonacci sequence or the Golden Ratio, in which each succeeding element is equal to the sum of the two preceding elements (i.e., 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, etc.). This numerical layout represents the balanced nature in her music through a sense of cell multiplication between live and non-live substances. She firmly believes that this abstract theory is the foundation of her personal musical expression. The Golden Ratio between the sections are always marked by some musical event, and composer explores her fantasy fully in articulating this moments.

The first work in which Gubaidulina experiments with this concept of proportionality is Perceptions for Soprano, Baritone, and Seven String Instruments (1981, rev. 1983-86). The 12th movement, Montys Tod (Monty's Death), uses the Fibonacci series in its rhythmical structure with the number of quarter notes in individual episodes corresponding to numbers from Fibonacci series.

In the early 1980s, she began to use the Fibonacci sequence as a way of structuring the form of the work. The sequence was especially appealing because it provides a basis for composition while still allowing the form to "breathe" It plays a prominent role in such pieces as Perception, Im Anfang war der Rhythmus, Quasi hoketus and the symphony Stimmen... Verstummen...). Later the Lucas and Evangelist series, sequences derived from that of Fibonacci, were added to her repertoire.

Year / Artwork Title Importance Medium
1965 Sonata for Flute and Piano 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Leslie Newman - Flute
Amande Huron - Piano
1969 Musical Toys 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Mechanical Accordion
Magic Roundabout
The Trumpeter in the Forest
The Magic Smith
April Day
Song of the Fisherman
The Little Tit
A Bear Playing the Double Bass and the Black Woman
The Woodpecker
The Elk Clearing
Sleigh with Little Bells
The Echo
The Drummer
Forest Musicians

Mei Yo Foo - Piano

1971 String Quartet No 1 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Stamic Quartet
1972 Steps (Stufen) 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Gennady Rozhdestvensky - Narrotor
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky
1974 Ten Preludes 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Boris Pergamenschikow - Violincello
1978 De Profundis 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Elsbeth Moser - Bayan
1978 Sounds of the Forest 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Leslie Newman - Flute
Amande Huron - Piano
1978 Introitus 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Concerto for Piano and Chamber Orchestra

Alexei Lubimov - piano
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen cond. Heinrich Schiff

1979 In Croce 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Elsbeth Moser - Bayan
Maria Kliegel - Cello

1982 Seven Words 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Boris Pergamenschikow - Violincello
Elsbeth Moser - Bayan
Munchener Kammerorchester cond. Christoph Poppen
1982 Seven Words 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Elsbeth Moser - Bayan
Maria Kliegel - Cello
Camerata Transsylvanica cond. Gyorgy Selmeczi

1984 Hommage a Marina Tsvetaeva 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Danish National Choir cond. Stefan Parkman
1980-1986 Offertorium for Violin and Orchestra 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Gideon Kremer - Violin
Boston Symphony Orchestra cond. Charles Dutoit
1986 Stimmen.....Verstummen 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky
1987 Hommage a T. S. Eliot, For Octet And Soprano 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Christine Whittlesey - Soprano
Boston Symphony Orchestra cond. Charles Dutoit
1987 String Quartet No 2 4.00 stars CD
New Music I Comments:
Kronos Quartet
1987 String Quartet No 2 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Stamic Quartet
1987 String Quartet No 3 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Stamic Quartet
1991 Silenzio, Five pieces for bayan, violin & cello 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Geir Draugsvoll - Bayan
Trondheim Symphony Orchestra cond.. Oyvind Gimse
1991 Silenzio, Five pieces for bayan, violin & cello 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Elsbeth Moser - Bayan
Kathrin Rabus - Soprano
Maria Kliegel - Cello

1993 String Quartet No 4 witrh Tape 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Stamic Quartet
1994 In Erwartung 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
For Saxophone Quartet
Quatuor Habanera
1997 Canticle of the Sun 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Dedicated to Rostropovitch

For Cello, Chamber Choir and Percussion

Tom Nybye, Gert Soerensen - Percussion
Alice Noerregaard - Cello
Danish National Choir cond. Stefan Parkman

2002 Reflections on the Thema B-A-C-H 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Stamic Quartet
2007 Violin Concerto In tempus praesens 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Anne-Sophie Mutter - Violin
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev
2009-2011 Fachwerk, for bayan, percussion & string orchestra 4.00 stars CD
Comments:
Geir Draugsvoll - Bayan
Trondheim Symphony Orchestra cond.. Oyvind Gimse