Serge Prokofiev

Prokofiev was born in Sontsovka (now the village of Krasne in Donetsk oblast), Russian Empire (now Ukraine) as an only child. His mother was a pianist and his father a relatively wealthy agricultural engineer.Prokofiev displayed unusual musical abilities at an early age and in 1902, when he started taking private lessons in composition, he had already produced a number of pieces. As soon as he had the necessary theoretical tools he quickly started experimenting, laying the base for his own musical style.

After a while, Prokofiev felt that the isolation in Sontsovka was restricting his further musical development. Although his parents were not too keen on forcing their son into a musical career at such an early age, in 1904 he moved to St Petersburg and applied to the Academy of Music. He passed the introductory tests and started his composition studies the same year, being several years younger than most of his classmates. He was viewed as eccentric and arrogant, and he often expressed dissatisfaction with much of the education, which he found boring. During this period he studied under, among others, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. He also became friends with Boris Asafiev and Nikolai Myaskovsky.In the St Petersburg music scene, Sergei would gradually get a reputation as an enfant terrible, while also getting praise for his original compositions which he would perform himself on the piano. In 1909 he graduated from his class in composition, getting less than impressive marks. He continued at the academy, but now concentrated on playing the piano and conducting. His piano lessons went far from smoothly, but the composition classes made an impression on him. His teacher encouraged his musical experimentation, and his works from this period display more intensity than earlier ones.In 1910 Prokofiev's father died and Sergei's economic support ceased. Luckily, at that time he had started making a name for himself as a composer, although he frequently caused scandals with his forward-looking works. His first two piano concertos were composed around this time.

In 1914 Prokofiev left the academy, this time with the highest marks, which won him a grand piano. Soon afterwards he made a trip to London where he made contact with Sergei Diaghilev and Igor Stravinsky.During World War I, Prokofiev returned again to the academy, now studying organ. He composed an opera based on Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel The Gambler, but the rehearsals were plagued by problems and the premiere scheduled for 1917 had to be cancelled because of the February Revolution. In summer the same year, Prokofiev composed his first symphony, the Classical. This was his own name for the symphony, which was composed in a style inspired by, for example, Joseph Haydn (see Neoclassicism (music)). After a brief stay with his mother in Kislovodsk, Kaukasus, because of worries of the enemy capturing Petrograd (the new name for St Petersburg), he returned in 1918, but he was now determined to leave Russia, at least temporarily. In the current Russian state of unrest he saw no room for his experimental music and in May he headed for the USA.

Arriving in San Francisco he was immediately compared to other famous 'exile' Russians (such as Sergei Rachmaninoff), and he started out successfully with a solo concert in New York, leading to several further engagements. He also received a contract for the production of his new opera The Love for Three Oranges, but due to illness and the death of the conductor the premiere was cancelled, another example of Prokofiev's bad luck in operatic matters. The failure also cost him his American solo career, since the opera took too much time and effort. He soon found himself in financial difficulties, and in April 1920 he left for Paris, not wanting to return to Russia as a failure.Paris was better prepared for Prokofiev's musical style. He reaffirmed his contacts with the Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and with Stravinsky, and returned to some of his older unfinished works such as the third piano concerto. Later, in 1921, The Love for Three Oranges finally premiered in Chicago, but the reception was cold, forcing Prokofiev to leave America again without triumph.Now Prokofiev moved with his mother to the Bavarian Alps for over a year, so as to concentrate fully on his composing. Mostly he spent time on an old opera project, The Fiery Angel. By this time his later music had started sifting back into Russia and he received invitations to return there, but he felt that his new European career was more important. In 1923 he married the Spanish singer Lina Llubera, before moving back to Paris.\

There a number of his works (for example the Second Symphony) were performed, but critical reception was lukewarm, perhaps because he could no longer really lay claim to being a 'novelty'. He did not particularly like Stravinsky's later works and even though he was quite friendly with members of 'Les Six', musically he had very little in common with them.Around 1927 things started looking up; he had some exciting commissions from Diaghilev and made a number of concert tours in Russia; in addition he enjoyed a very successful staging of The Love for Three Oranges in Leningrad (as Petrograd was now known). Two older operas (one of them The Gambler) were also played in Europe and in 1928 he produced the Third Symphony which was broadly based on his unperformed opera The Fiery Angel. The years 1931 and 1932 saw the completion of his fourth and fifth piano concertos.

In 1929 he had a car accident in which his hands were slightly injured, preventing him from touring in Moscow, but permitting him to enjoy some of the contemporary Russian music instead. After his hands healed he made a new attempt at touring in the USA, and this time he was received very warmly, propped up by his recent success in Europe. This in turn propelled him to do a large tour through Europe.

In the early 1930s Prokofiev was starting to long for Russia again, moving more and more of his premieres and commissions to his home country instead of Paris. An example of the later is Lieutenant Kije, which was commissioned as the score to a Russian film. Another commission, from the Kirov Theatre in Leningrad, was the ballet Romeo and Juliet, today one of Prokofiev's best known works. However, there were numerous choreographical problems, postponing the premiere for several years.

In 1936 Prokofiev and his family moved back to Russia permanently. At this time, the official Russian policy towards music changed; a special bureau, the 'Composers' Union', was established in order to keep track of the artists and their doings, and regulations were drawn up outlining what kind of music was acceptable. These policies would gradually cause almost complete isolation for the Russian composers from the rest of the world, by limiting outside influences. Still mostly untouched by this, Prokofiev turned to composing music for children (Three Songs for Children, Peter and the Wolf, and so on) as well as the gigantic Cantata for the Twentieth Anniversary of the October Revolution, which was, however, never performed. The premiere of the opera Semyon Kotko was postponed, this time because the producer Vsevolod Meyerhold was imprisoned and executed. Most of Prokofiev's opera projects were plagued by ill luck.

In 1941 Sergei suffered his first heart attack. It would be followed by others, resulting in a gradual decline in health. Because of the war, he was periodically evacuated south together with a large number of other artists. This had consequences for his family life in Moscow, and his relationship with the 25-year-old Mira Mendelson finally led to his separation from his wife, although they remained married. It should also be mentioned that marriage with foreigners was made illegal at this time and that the breakup with his wife was probably forced.

The outbreak of war inspired Prokofiev to a new opera project, War and Peace, which he worked on for two years, along with more film music for Sergei Eisenstein (Ivan the Terrible) and the second string quartet. However, the Union had many opinions about the opera which had to undergo numerous revisions and no premiere. In 1944, Prokofiev moved to an estate outside of Moscow, to compose his Fifth Symphony which would turn out to be his most successful. It was overwhelmingly received, but shortly afterwards, Sergei suffered a concussion from which he never really recovered, and which severely lowered his productivity in later years.

Prokofiev had time to write his Sixth Symphony and a ninth piano sonata (his last) before the Party suddenly changed its opinion about his music. The end of the war allowed the attention to turn inwards again and the Party saw fit to tighten its reins on domestic artists. Prokofiev's music was now suddenly seen as a grave example of 'formalism', and generally dangerous to the Soviet people.On February 20, 1948 his wife Lina was arrested for 'espionage' she tried to send money to her mother in Spain via an embassy. She was sentenced to 20 years, but was eventually released after Stalin's death and later left the Soviet Union; her later years were financially secure due to music royalties. In that same year, Prokofiev married Mira.

His latest opera projects were quickly cancelled from the Kirov Theatre and this, in combination with his declining health, caused Prokofiev to retire more and more from the scene. Most of his later compositions come across as lame, missing the old 'spark'. His last performance was in connection with the premiere of the Seventh Symphony in 1952. He died from a cerebral haemorrhage on 5 March 1953 (ironically, the same day as Stalin). He is buried in the Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow, Russia.

Year / Artwork Title Importance Medium
1910 Ossenele (Autumnal) Opus 8 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Ossenele (Autumnal) Opus 8 Comments:

USSR Radio Symphony Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky

1911-1912 Piano Concerto No 1 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Piano Concerto No 3, No 1 Piano Sonate No 3 Comments:
Piano: Gary Graffman, Cleveland Orchestra conductor George Szell
1911-1912 Piano Concerto No 1 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:
Martha Argerich - Piano
Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal cond. Charles Dutroit
1912 Piano Sonata No 2 Opus 14 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Gyorgy Sandor Comments:

Gyorgy Sandor - Piano

1911-1914 Five sarcasms Opus 17 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Gyorgy Sandor Comments:

Gyorgy Sandor - Piano

1916 Five Poems by Anna Akhmatova Opus 27 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Five Poems by Anna Akhmatova Opus 27 Comments:

Galina Wischnewskaja - Soprano
Mstislav Rostropovitch - Piano

1907-1917 Piano Sonate No 3 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Piano Concerto No 3, No 1 Piano Sonate No 3 Comments:
Gary Graffman - Piano
1914-1917 The Gambler 4.00 out of 5 stars BD-R
Comments:
Synopsis

Place: Roulettenberg, a fictional European spa resort
Time: The 1860s

Act I

In the Grand Hotel garden, Alexei, tutor to the General's family, meets Polina, the General's ward, who is in debt to the Marquis. Alexei loves Polina, and informs her that he observed her directions to pawn her jewelry and gamble with the funds. However, he lost the money. The General is enamoured of the much younger demimondaine Blanche, and enters with her, the Marquis and Mr Astley, an Englishman. When asked about his losses, Alexei says he lost his own savings. He is chided that someone of his modest income should not gamble, but Alexei dismisses the idea of saving money with a caustic diatribe. Astley is impressed and invites Alexei to tea. The General then receives a telegram from "Babulenka" (literally a diminutive of 'grandmother'; she is in fact the General's aunt and Polina's grandmother) in Moscow. The General is hoping that Babulenka will die soon so that he can inherit her money and marry Blanche.

Polina is frustrated that she cannot repay her debts to the Marquis. While Alexei continues to protest that he loves her, she wonders if he has any other interest than greed. The General interrupts their conversation. Polina challenges Alexei to prove his love, and to see if he would truly do anything for her, by making a pass at a German Baroness sitting in the park. Alexei does this, to the anger of the Baron. In the ensuing fuss, the Baron and Baroness leave.

Act II

In the hotel lobby, the General reproaches Alexei for his actions. Alexei is unrepentant, upon which the General dismisses him as his family tutor. The General then tries to obtain the help of the Marquis in preventing any appearance of a scandal. Mr. Astley enters, and explains to Alexei the General's concerns. Blanche had earlier asked the Baron for a loan, which upset the Baroness. Because of the high social status of the Baron and Baroness, the General is keen to avoid any sense of impropriety. Astley further explains that the General cannot propose to Blanche until he receives his share of the inheritance from Babulenka. Alexei begins to think that once Polina receives her own share of the inheritance, the Marquis will attempt to win her over.

The Marquis appears on the General's behalf, to try to mollify Alexei's behaviour. Alexei is contemptuous to the Marquis, until the Marquis produces a note from Polina, which calls on Alexei to stop behaving like a schoolboy. Alexei accuses him of making Polina write the letter and leaves in anger. The Marquis tells the General and Blanche that he was successful in subduing Alexei.

The General predicts Babulenka's death that same evening, but immediately afterwards, her voice is heard, as she has arrived at the hotel, in good health. She greets Alexei and Polina with some affection, but at once she sees through the General and the others. She says that she has overcome her illness and plans to recuperate, and gamble, at the spa..

Act III

At the casino, Babulenka has been losing her money at the roulette tables, and ignoring all pleas to stop. The General is despondent and sees his chances with Blanche diminish. After the Marquis tells just how much Babulenka has lost, the General suggests to summon the police but The Marquis dissuades him. Alexei arrives, and the General and the Marquis ask for his help to halt Babulenka's gambling losses. Prince Nilsky, another potential suitor to Blanche, then arrives and further enumerates Babulenka's losses. The General collapses, distraught, and then runs into the casino. Blanche departs with Nilsky. Alexei wonders of what will happen with Polina's family, after Babulenka's financial losses. Babulenka, exhausted and depleted of funds, wants to go home to Moscow. Babulenka asks Polina to come with her, but declines. The General bewails Babulenka's losses and his own loss of Blanche to Nilsky.

Act IV

In his hotel room, Alexei finds Polina, who has a letter from the Marquis. The Marquis says he is selling Generel's properties mortgaged to him, but will forgive fifty thousand for Polina's sake, and Marquis will consider their relationship as over. Polina feels this paying her off as an insult and wish she had fifty thousand to fling at Marquis's face. Alexei is deliriously pleased that Polina has turned to him for assistance.

Rushing to the casino, Alexei has a run of good luck, winning twenty times in a row and breaking the bank. After an entr'acte, the other patrons continue to talk about Alexei's run. Alexei returns to his room, yet he continues to hear the voices of the croupiers and the other gamblers. He then becomes aware of Polina who has been waiting for him. He offers her funds to pay the Marquis back. She refuses and asks whether he really loves her. When Alexei gives her the money, she tosses it back in his face and runs out. The opera ends with Alexei alone in the room, recalling obsessively his success at the tables.

Solists
Marinsky Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

Recorded from MEZZO TV

1915-1917 20 Visions Fugitives Opus 22 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Gyorgy Sandor Comments:

Gyorgy Sandor - Piano

1915-1917 Visions Fugitives Opus 22 No 3, 6 and 9 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Comments:

Svjatoslav Richter - Piano

1915-1917 20 Visions Fugitives Opus 22 (Extracts) 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Americana Comments:

Borodin Quartet

1916-1917 Symphony No 1 (Classical) 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Symphony No 1 [Classical] Comments:
This is a good recording of Prokofiev's lighthearted symphony.

Philharmonia Orchestra cond. Efrem Kurtz

1916-1917 Symphony No 1 (Classical) 4.50 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1916-1917 Symphony No 1 (Classical) 4.50 out of 5 stars DVD
Comments:

L'ORTF Orchestre cond. Igor Markevitch

1917 Piano Concert No 3 4.50 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Piano Concerto No 3, No 1 Piano Sonate No 3 Comments:
One of the most exciting piano concerts, ever.

Piano: Gary Graffman, Cleveland Orchestra conductor George Szell
1917 Piano Concert No 3 5.00 out of 5 stars CD
Sergei Prokofiev - Piano Concert No 3 Comments:

Martha Argerich - Piano
Bertliner Philharmoniker cond. Claudio Abbado

1917 Piano Concert No 3 5.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:

Martha Argerich - Piano
Bertliner Philharmoniker cond. Claudio Abbado

1917 Piano Concert No 3 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Piano Concert No 3 Comments:

Marina Mdivani - Piano
USSR Radio Symphony Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky

1917 Piano Concerto No 3 4.50 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:
Martha Argerich - Piano
Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal cond. Charles Dutroit
1917 Piano Concerto No 3 4.50 out of 5 stars DVD-R
Comments:
Yuja Wang - Piano
Concertgebouw Orchestra cond. Daniele Gatti

Mezzo recording uploaded from Youtube

1921 Chout 4.50 out of 5 stars LP
Chout Comments:
Orchestral Suite from the ballet.

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado
1921 Chout 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:
Orchestral Suite from the ballet.

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Walter Susskind
1924 Quintet Opus 39 4.00 out of 5 stars LP

Comments:

Solists cond.Gennadi Roshdestwensky.

1924 Love for the three Oranges 3.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Love for the three Oranges Comments:
This is a complete recording of Prokofiev's comic opera.

Synopsis:

The absurd story is in the Commedia dell'Arte tradition, and concerns a young prince, cursed by a wicked witch and forced to voyage into distant lands in search of three oranges, each of which contains a princess. The libretto was adapted by Prokofiev and Vera Janacopoulos from Vsevolod Meyerhold's translation of Gozzi's play. The adaptation modernized some of the Commedia dell'Arte influences and also introduced a healthy dose of Surrealism. At its premiere, the opera was sung in French, as L'Amour des trois oranges.

Solist, Choir and Moscow Radio Orchestra cond. Dzhemal Dalgat

1924-1925 Symphony No 2 4.00 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1926 Le Pas d'Arcier 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Le Pas d'Arcier Comments:

Ballet music
USSR Radio Symphony Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky

1928 Symphony No 3 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1929-1930 Symphony No 4 Original 4.00 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

Revised in 1947

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1930 Andante for String Orchestra Opus 50 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Andante for String Orchestra Opus 50 Comments:

USSR Radio Symphony Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky

1931 Symphony No 1 Opus 25 Piano Version 4.00 out of 5 stars 6 CD
Comments:

Piano Version by Prokofiev

Martha Argerich - Piano
Yefim Bronfman - Piano

1934 Lieutenant Kijé 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Andante for String Orchestra Opus 50 Comments:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra cind. Fritz Reiner

1936 Peter and the Wolf 4.50 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Peter en de Wolf Comments:
This record is a gem. Not just for the music, which is first rate. (Concertgebouworkest, Bernard Haitink), but first of all for the wonderful artwork on the sleeve by dutch illustrator Peter Vos. A treat for grown-up children.

Narrated by Henk van Ulsen
1936 Peter and the Wolf 4.50 out of 5 stars CD
Sergei Prokofiev - Peter en de Wolf Comments:
She is not afraid of the big bad wolf, Dame Edna Everage

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra cond. John Lanchberry

1935-1936 Romeo and Juliet 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Sergei Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet [Complete] (Boston Symphony Orch. cond. Seiji Ozawa) Comments:
The complete ballet music.

Boston Symphony Orchestra cond. Seiji Ozawa
1936 Romeo and Juliet 4.50 out of 5 stars LP
Romeo and Juliet Comments:
Orchestral Suite from the ballet.

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Claudio Abbado
1936 Romeo and Juliet (Complete Ballet) 4.50 out of 5 stars DVD-R
Comments:
This is a classic film with Rudolf Noureyev and Margot Fonteyn as Romeo and Juliet.
Beautiful filmed in colour and widescreen.
1941-1942 Betrothal in a Monastery 4.00 out of 5 stars BD-R
Comments:
Betrothal in a Monastery is an opera by Sergei Prokofiev, his sixth with an opus number. The libretto, in Russian, was by the composer and Mira Mendelson (his companion in later life), after Richard Brinsley Sheridan's ballad opera libretto for Thomas Linley the younger's The Duenna.

Prokofiev began the work in 1940, and it was in rehearsal that year, but World War II halted production of the opera. The first performance did not occur until 3 November 1946 at the Kirov Theatre with Boris Khaikin conducting.

Commentators have noted that, given the context of its creation in the 1940s in the Soviet Union, this opera lacks any particular political or social comment, except perhaps for a scene involving drunken monks.

This Kirov Opera production of Prokofiev’s lyrical comedy. Set in 18th century Seville, Prokofiev’s adaptation of a play by the English playwright Sheridan is an opera buffo par excellence, featuring lovers in disguise, a stern father thwarted, a rich suitor discomfited, venal monks, unreliable servants – and, inevitably, young love triumphant. The cast is led by Anna Netrebko as the beautiful heroine, supported by Larissa Diadkova as her scheming duenna.

Marianna Tarasova (Mezzo Soprano)
Larissa Diadkova (Mezzo Soprano)
Anna Netrebko (Soprano),
Nikolai Gassiev (Tenor)
Alexandr Gergalov (Baritone)
Evgeny Akimov (Tenor)
Orchestra/Ensemble: Kirov Theater Orchestra
Kirov Theater Chorus cond: Valery Gergiev

Recorded from BRAVAKLASSIEK TV The Netherlands

1944 Symphony No 5 4.50 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1944 Symphony No 5 4.00 out of 5 stars DVD-R
Comments:

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra cond. Kirill Karabits

Recorded from BBC Proms 2015

1945-1947 Symphony No 6 4.00 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1945-1947 Symphony No 6 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:

Scottish National Orchestra cond. Neeme Jarvi

1947 Symphony No 4 Revised 4.00 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1939-1940 Piano Sonata No 6 Opus 82 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Piano Sonata No 6 Comments:

Robert Szidon - Piano

1939-1942 Piano Sonata No 7 Opus 83 5.00 out of 5 stars CD
Piano Sonata No 7 Comments:

The second part, Andante caloroso, is the perfect sentimental song. (Smartlap)

Maurizio Pollini - Piano

1939 Piano Sonata No 8 Opus 84 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Comments:

Svjatoslav Richter - Piano

1942-1943 War and Peace 4.00 out of 5 stars BD25
Comments:

Sergei Prokofiev devoted the last twelve years of his life to War and Peace. He completed the instrumentalisation by April 1942 and the entire score was ready in March 1943. Having completed the first version (containing eleven scenes) unusually quickly, the composer continued working on the opera over the next ten years. Consequently, the work has appeared in different versions and orchestrations. Tolstoy’s massive chronicle of Russian family life during and after the Napoleonic Wars is one of the greatest novels in world literature and is very close to the hearts and experiences of the Russian people. During World War II, another ‘great patriotic war’, the Soviet authorities, in the face of the Nazi invasion, pasted pages of Tolstoy’s book on to public buildings. Writing his final opera during this momentous period, Prokofiev very skilfully captured Tolstoy’s piercing insight into human nature, choosing dramatic key moments from Tolstoy to reflect private and public destinies against a background of Russia under threat. This production of War and Peace was mounted at a time when the country was again undergoing momentous changes. The greatest landmark in the stage history of the opera came with the 1991 production at the Mariinsky Theatre, when Prokoviev´s complete score was performed for the first time with no cuts (the musical director and conductor was Valéry Gergiev and the production was directed by Graham Vick and designed by Tim O´Brian). This production, staged at the start of the third millennium, presents a fresh reading of Prokofiev´s masterpiece.

Yelena Prochina
Irina Bogachova
Alexander Gergalov
Nicolai Okhotnikov
Gegam Grigorian
Olga Borodina

Orchestra and Chorus of the Mariinsky Theatre cond. Valery Gergiev

1942-1943 Sonata for Flute and Piano Opus 94 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sonata for Flute and Piano Opus 94 Comments:

James Galway - Flute
Martha Argerich - Piano

1942-1943 Sonata for Violin and Piano in D Major, Op. 94a 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Violin
Lambert Orkis - Piano

1940-1944 Cinderella (Ballet suite) 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Cinderella [Ballet suite] Comments:
I really love these old Supraphon recordings. The playing screams tender loving care and the recording-engineers always do a magnificent job. At the time I should have bought many more.

The Cinderella ballet suite is a loose collection of musical numbers. A bit more traditional than most of Prokofiev's other work, but very nice nevertheless.

Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra cond. Jean Meylan.
1944 Symphony No 5 4.50 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Symphony No 5 Comments:
A Supraphon recording, pressed in Switzerland.

Tschechische Philharmonie cond. Ladislav Slovák
1942-1946 Ivan the Terrible 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - Ivan the Terrible Comments:
This music has been written for the film by Eisenstein.
Reworked to an oratorio by Abram Stasevitch.

For Speaker, mezzo-soprano, baritone, choir and orchestra.
USSR Symphony Orchestra cond. Abram Stasevitch
1938-1946 Sonata for Violin and Piano Opus 80 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Prokofiev =- Janacek Comments:

David Oistrakh - Violin
Frida Bauer - Piano

1946 Waltz Suite Opus 110 No 2, 5. 6 4.00 out of 5 stars CD
Comments:

Scottish National Orchestra cond. Neeme Jarvi

1949 Sonata for Cello and Piano in C Opus 119 4.00 out of 5 stars 2 CD
Comments:

Truls Mork - Cello
Lars Vogt - Piano

1950 version On Guard for Peace 3.50 out of 5 stars LP
Sergei Prokofiev - On Guard for Peace Comments:
Written in 1942 it is an oratorio about German occupation.
It is not Prokofiev's greatest music. Read this.

Solists, Choir and Moscow Radio Orchestra cond. Gennady Rozhdestvensky.
1948-1949 The Tale of the Stone Flower, Ballet in 4 Acts, Op.118 4.0 out of 5 importance CD

Comments:

Waltz (Arranged for Cello and Piano by G.Piatigorsky and S. Knushevitsky)

Mischa Maisky - Cello
Martha Argerich - Piano

1949 Sonata for Cello and Piano Opus 119 4.0 out of 5 importance CD

Comments:

Mischa Maisky - Cello
Martha Argerich - Piano

1951-1952 Symphony No 7 4.00 out of 5 stars 4CD
Comments:

London Symphony Orchestra cond. Valery Gergiev

1952 Piano Concert No 5 4.00 out of 5 stars LP
Comments:

Svjatoslav Richter - Piano
Sinfonie-Orchester de Nationalen Philharmonie Warschau cond. Witold Rowicki