Serge Rachmaninov

He studied at the Moscow Conservatory (1885-92) under Zverev (where Skryabin was a fellow pupil) and his cousin Ziloti for piano and Taneyev and Arensky for composition, graduating with distinction as both pianist and composer (the opera Aleko, given at the Bol'shoy in 1893, was his diploma piece). During the ensuing years he composed piano pieces (including his famous c-sharp Minor Prelude), songs and orchestral works, but the disastrous premiere in 1897 of his Symphony no.1, poorly conducted by Glazunov, brought about a creative despair that was not dispelled until he sought medical help in 1900: then he quickly composed his Second Piano Concerto. Meanwhile he had set out on a new career as a conductor, appearing in Moscow and London; he later was conductor at the Bol'shoy, 1904-6.

By this stage, and most particularly in the Piano Concerto no.2, the essentials of his art had been assembled: the command of the emotional gesture conceived as lyrical melody extended from small motifs, the concealrnent behind this of subtleties in orchestration and structure, the broad sweep of his lines and forms, the predominant melancholy and nostalgia, the loyalty to the finer Russian Romanticism inherited from Tchaikovsky and his teachers. These things were not to change, and during the remaining years to the Revolution they provided him with the matenals for a sizable output of operas, liturgical music, orchestral works, piano pieces and songs, even though composition was generally restricted to periods of seclusion between concert engagements. In 1909 he made his first American tour as a pianist, for which he wrote the Piano Concerto no.3.

Soon after the October Revolution he left Russia with his family for Scandinavia; in 1918 they arrived in New York, where he mainly lived thereafter, though he spent periods in Paris (where he founded a publishing firm), Dresden and Switzerland. There was a period of creative silence until 1926 when he wrote the Piano Concerto no.4, followed by only a handful of works over the next 15 years, even though all are on a large scale. During this period, however, he was active as a pianist on both sides of the Atlantic (though never again in Russia). As a pianist he was famous for his precision, rhythmic drive, legato and clarity of texture and for the broad design of his performances.

Year / Artwork Title Importance Medium
1898-1890 String Quartet No 1, Romance 4.00 stars CD
Americana Comments:
Borodin Quartet
1891 Piano Concerto No 1 4.0 stars 10" LP
Comments:
Byron Janis - Piano
Filharmonisch Orkest Moskou cond. Cyril Kondrashin
1891 Piano Concerto No 1 4.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Vladimir Ashkenazy - Piano
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Andre Previn
1892 Two Pieces Opus 2 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Truls Mork - Cello
Jean-Yves Thibaudet - Piano
1893 Suite No 1 Opus 5 for two pianos 3.50 stars 6 CD
Comments:
Martha Argerich - Piano
Lilya Zilberstein - Piano
1894 Six Morceaux for Piano Quatre Mains Opu 11 3.50 stars 6 CD
Comments:
Martha Argerich - Lilya Zilberstein - Piano
1896 Symphony No 1 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Concertgebouw Orchestra cond. Vladimir Ashkenazy
1900 Piano Concerto No 2 Opus 18 4.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Vladimir Ashkenazy - Piano
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Andre Previn
1900-1901 Suite No 2 Opus 17 for two pianos 3.50 stars 2 CD
Sessions IV Comments:
Martha Argerich - Piano
Nelson Freire - Piano
1900-1901 Suite No 2 Opus 17 for two pianos 3.50 stars 6 CD
Comments:
Martha Argerich - Piano
Gabriela Montero - Piano
1901 Sonata in g minor for Cello and Piano 3.50 stars CD
Comments:
Celloproject
- Eckhart Runge - Cello
- Jacques Ammon - Piano
1901 Sonata in g minor for Cello and Piano 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Truls Mork - Cello
Jean-Yves Thibaudet - Piano
1900-1905 Melody 3.50 stars CD
Comments:
Paraphrase from opus 21 and 25

Celloproject
- Eckhart Runge - Cello
- Jacques Ammon - Piano

1908 Symphony No 2 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Concertgebouw Orchestra cond. Vladimir Ashkenazy
1909 Piano Concerto No 3 Opus 30 4.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Vladimir Ashkenazy - Piano
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Andre Previn
1912 Vocalise Opus 34 No 14 3.50 stars CD
Comments:
Celloproject
- Eckhart Runge - Cello
- Jacques Ammon - Piano
1912 Vocalise Opus 34 No 14 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Truls Mork - Cello
Jean-Yves Thibaudet - Piano
ca. 1913 Sonate No 2 Opus 36 3.50 stars LP
Sessions IV Comments:
Roberto Szidon - Piano
1926 Piano Concert No 4 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Vladimir Ashkenazy - Piano
London Symphony Orchestra cond. Andre Previn
1913-1931 Sonata for Piano no 2 in B flat minor, Op. 36 3.50 stars CD

Comments:

Wen-Yu Shen -Piano

1936 Symphony No 3 3.50 stars 2 CD
Comments:
Concertgebouw Orchestra cond. Vladimir Ashkenazy
Documentary The Joy of Rachmaninoff 3.50 stars DVD-R
Comments:
Tom Service takes a cinematic journey through Russia on the trail of the wondrous yet melancholic melodies of Russian giant Sergei Rachmaninoff. A celebration of a composer's musical triumph over critical adversity and Soviet terror, with performances and contributions from Vladimir Ashkenazy, Denis Matsuev, Steven Isserlis, Stephen Hough, Vladimir Jurowski, Lucy Parham and James Rhodes.

Documentary recorded from BBC Four